Species Information

Nesofregetta fuliginosa

Species Authority

(Gmelin, 1789)

Common Name/s

Polynesian Storm-petrel

Species Status

Endangered

Organism Type

Migratory Seabird

Taxonomy

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Procellariiformes
Family: Oceanitidae

Environment/System

terrestrial/marine

Invasive Species Threat Summary

The White-throated Storm-petrel Nesofregetta fuliginosa is classified as ‘Endangered (EN)’ in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is native to Chile, Fiji, French Polynesia and Kiribati (BirdLife International 2010).

The current known population is 1,000-1,600 mature individuals. However this is based on surveys from the 1990s and as such the population may actually be lower than this (BirdLife International 2011). It usually nests in colonies with burrows dug in sand, under vegetation or in rock-crevices (BirdLife International 2011).

A major threat to the White-throated Storm-petrel is predation by rats (Rattus spp.) and cats (Felis catus). Predation of eggs and small chicks by the house mouse Mus musculus) is an additional threat (BirdLife International 2011).

Invasive Species Management Summary

Current conservation methods include a cat eradication programme in Kirimati, which was unsuccessful. A total of 23 motu (islets) in Kiribati have been targeted for rat eradication, with more planned for the future. In New Caledonia the Société Calédonienne d'Ornithologie was due to implement a rat eradication program on 18 islets in order to restore suitable breeding area for N. fuliginosa. Rabbit and rat eradication was also implemented on McKean and Phoenix Island (Kiribati) in 2008. Future recommendations for management of threats include further eradications of rats and cats from small islets within its breeding range and throughout the Line and Phoenix Islands (BirdLife International 2011).

Conservation Outcomes

Conservation actions underway On Kiritimati, a cat eradication programme has failed to limit predation by feral cats outside villages (M. Rauzon in litt. 1999, E. A. Schreiber in litt. 1999) but, at Jarvis Island National Wildlife Refuge (200 miles from Kiritimati), a colonisation programme has been successful and, in March 2000, three N. fuliginosa were observed displaying (Flint and Aycock 2000). A total of 23 motu in the central lagoon area have been targeted for rat eradication, with more eradication on additional motu planned for the future (R. Pierce and D. Brown in litt. 2009). In New Caledonia, the Société Calédonienne d'Ornithologie was due to implement a rat eradication program on 18 islets including the site of the only previously known colony in 2007-2008 to restore suitable breeding conditions for the species (V. Chartendrault in litt. 2007). Rabbit and rat eradication occurred on McKean and Phoenix Island in 2008, though the results have not been confirmed (R. Pierce et al. in litt. 2008, R. Pierce in litt. 2009).Conservation actions proposed Survey all nesting islets (M. Rauzon in litt. 1999) including those off the main Samoan islands (SPREP 1999). Eradicate rats and cats from key small islets within its breeding range, e.g. Temoe Island (M. Rauzon in litt. 1999, G. Wragg in litt. 1999), and throughout the Line and Phoenix Islands (A. K. Kepler in litt. 2000).

References

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An Initiative of the ACP Group, funded by the European Union under the 10th EDF